9 Things You Never Knew About Hitler’s Black Victims

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As an Israeli offensive against the Palestinian civilian population winds down due to a cease fire, many observers are revisiting the circumstances that loosed white Holocaust survivors onto the Arab world. What people rarely speak of, however, are the Afro-Germans and Africans who were also victims of Adolph Hitler’s Nazi campaigns.

In the books Hitler’s Black Victims and Hitler’s African Victims, the ways in which blacks suffered is detailed.

1.) German scientists, as well as American researchers, looked to eugenics to solve the Negro problem:

In 1921, at the Second International Congress of Eugenics, where U.S. and German
representatives dominated, papers were presented with titles such as “Some Notes on the Negro Problem,” “The Problem of Negro-White Intermixture,” and “Intermarriage with the Slave Race.”

2.) Afro-Germans struggled to make a living due to racist laws:

Older Afro-Germans faced the fundamental issue of how to make a living. This concern was complicated by both the economic depression facing the nation and the laws that were passed in 1933 and 1934 banning “non-Aryans” from an endless array of occupations and professions in the private and public sectors.

German African soldiers

3.) Once Jews were fired from teaching positions, however, space was made available for blacks.

4.) Many African soldiers were killed on the way to POW camps, prior to that they were depicted as savages with German propaganda films (see picture above, film below.)

5.) The biggest proponents of German eugenics programs
learned their craft in the U.S. and one was a great admirer of white racism in the South.

Alfred Ploetz, the acknowledged founder of German eugenics, spent time in the United States where undoubtedly he solidified his admiration for the South’s segregation laws and popular practice.

6.) Blacks were sterilized under Hitler’s regime:

While information concerning black sterilization exists about Afro-German and African men, there were also a significant number of sterilizations of black women although exactly how many were done is unknown.

7.) Some blacks were even sterilized without the benefit of anesthesia, as was Hitler’s Black Victim Thomas Holzhauzer:

 He was picked up along with his sister and taken to the Elizabeth Hospital in Darmstadt. He remembers distinctly that the doctor, who was wearing a Nazi uniform, “made two cuts around my testicles” during the procedure. There is more than a little anger when he tells the filmmakers, “Sometimes I’m glad I could not have any children.”

8.) For the most part, Afro-Germans who were victimized by Hitler have not been compensated:

It has been a struggle, mostly unsuccessful, on the part of older Afro- Germans to benefit from these victories because of the difficulty in proving their repression and specific targeting by the Nazis. The denial of compensation to Afro- Germans is due in part to the lack of a popular moral outrage over their experiences at the hands of the Nazis.

9.) Hitler only spoke kindly of two blacks — Paul Robeson and Booker T. Washington.

Quotes taken from the two books mentioned above.

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